jaena: (Default)
 Going to bed the other night, I happened to touch a spot on my upper arm and noticed it was way swollen. It felt like a bi ol' tumor under the skin, and I was pretty sure that it wasn't there before. I freaked out a little bit, made my boyfriend feel it, he agreed it felt like a tumor, I freaked out more, and finally looked at it in the mirror. 

There was a visible lump on the backish side of my upper left arm, and it was red and warm.

"Ok," thought I, "this is probably not a tumor. I must've hit my arm on something, probably the door because I bump into doors all the time. Yeah, that's it."

I went back to bed and was telling all of that ^ to my boyfriend, and he agreed that it was probably just swelling from me hitting my arm on something and that it should go away on its own. If it didn't go away, THEN I should be worried, but for now it was time to not worry and to go to sleep.

So I was lying there, trying to remember when or where I'd hit my arm (hint: it's everywhere and all the time because I am clumsy) for like, way too long, staying up way too late, and finally

FINALLY

I remembered that I got a vaccine in that spot the day before :I
jaena: (Default)
I remember when I found out I had an allergy.  It was so long ago, that I don't even know how old I was, just that I was still living in California, so somewhere under 13 years old. I put some lotion on my arms, and I don't remember much about this part either, except that it was a raspberry or strawberry scented lotion, and the bottle definitely said "hypoallergenic."

That same day, my arms turned red and hot, and incredible itchy, with little bumps all over them. I would later learn that this was called "hives."

After scratching my arms constantly for a couple of days, much to the concern of all of my teachers, my mom took me to a doctor. They said I had an allergic reaction to the lotion I'd put on, and that "hypoallergenic" doesn't actually mean anything! I go a prescription for a steroid cream and got to go home, recover, and eventually forget about the incident.

Until January of 2011. That winter, my boyfriend and I went up to Massachusetts to visit his family over winter break. Our return flight home was delayed due to snow, and since the airport was over an hour away from his parents' house, his dad opted to get us a hotel room by the airport rather than continue to drive us down there before dawn every day, hoping that that would be the day the flight took off (side note: I will never forget his face when he dropped us off in the hotel lobby and said to us, "be smart." It was terrifying!).

We ended up staying a couple of nights at the hotel before our flight home was finally cleared, and during that time, I took a shower. A perfectly ordinary hotel shower. And since it was the dead of winter and the air was very dry, I put on some complementary hotel lotion after the shower to keep my skin from cracking. I then put on a sweater and flopped down on the hotel bed and called my mom to give her a status update.

We talked on the phone for a good while, and over that time, my arms grew progressively itchier. I eventually hung up, rolled up my sleeves, and saw my hives-ridden arms and knew that I had hecked up. My boyfriend, despite being a little freaked out, suggested we go to the closest pharmacy, because pharmacists know everything and could help us. So we got a taxi to take us to the closest pharmacy, which was a little Walgreens or something in a mall. I showed my arms and told my sad tale to the pharmacist, who immediately handed me some Benadryl (you can't be itchy if you're in a coma!) and expressed her surprise that I had a reaction to the hotel lotion, since those are almost always hypoallergenic.

That word now has less than no meaning to me :(

I still don't have any idea what I'm actually allergic to in the lotions. But now I exclusively buy lotions that don't say "hypoallergenic" on the bottle, and I put a little bit of any new product on my upper arm as a test patch before I put it anywhere else.

Hooray, allergies!
jaena: (Default)
 I was sitting on the couch with my boyfriend earlier, watching a streamer play some Mario World romhack or something. The guy gets to an underwater stage, and my boyfriend points out that there's no timer for this stage, instead there's a thermometer, and when the temperature reaches either 0 or 70, Mario dies or whatever.

"I get that he's freezing at 0, but why does he die at 70?" I asked.

"Because the water is boiling," he replied.

"No???? Water boils at 100 degrees if it freezes at 0????" 

"It's celsius, though, not fahrenheit. You know, centigrade?"

"............You took Latin in high school, so help me out. Centigrade means what? I'll give you a hint: what number is always associated with percents?"


"100?"


"Right. The entire basis of the centigrade system is water's phase changes. 0 is freezing, 100 is boiling, it's just easier that way. Compare to fahrenheit, where 32 and 212 are freezing and boiling, respectively, which is totally arbitrary*. Furthermore, I'm really insulted that you would mansplain to me, a medical student, your totally incorrect explanation of temperature systems that I know and use ALL THE TIME."

"Oh my God did I really just mansplain? I'm so sorry, I'm the worst."

"Yes."

Anyways, Mario doesn't get boiled alive, he just burns to death.




*Side note: I know they're not arbitrary and there's a logical reason for those numbers, but it's just not a practical one. I boil and freeze plain water all the time, not brine made from equal parts ice and salt. Seriously Fahrenheit, why????? THIS IS WHY THE REST OF THE WORLD USES CELSIUS.